Image Quality and Storage Space Requirements

We've been getting a lot or enquiries about the disk space requirements of CSI vs. those of other Image management systems. Some suppliers of these systems are promoting high-ratio file compression which makes for smaller files. The supposed benefits are less hard disk space usage as well as greater speed. It is important to note that:

  • Some of these systems were designed some time ago. A number of years ago, disk space would have been an issue as hard drives would have been very small compared to today's standards. Today, however, hard disk capacity is well beyond what any office would require. For example, a client of ours has been digital for 7 years and his data is between 10 and 15 GB. An 80GB hard drive is pretty much the minimum today and upgrading to much larger drives is a minimal investment.
  • CSI also compresses the images using the highest possible compression without loss of quality. This is known as Lossless compression. See this link for a discussion on lossless compression http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lossless_data_compression

CSI will offer the highest quality. We could compress them further and sacrifice quality, but we have chosen to go with the highest quality images since further compression would be a lose-lose situation since speed would not be noticeably enhanced while quality would be inferior. We compared CSI images against competitive software images at client sites and CSI images were decidedly sharper to the naked eye. On top of everything, compressed files don't equate to speed. This is because the computer has the additional overhead of having to uncompress the images before displaying them. To find out more click here.

If you have any further questions please contact The Bridge Network.

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